To Agree

There are several expressions that use the verb “to agree” followed by a preposition.

1) To agree with – to accept an idea or another person’s point of view, to be in accord; also, to be compatible, pleasing, or congruent.
Examples:
I agree with you that a multilateral well might be a good option in this case.
Thai food doesn’t agree with me.
Make sure your verb agrees with the subject of your sentence.

2) To agree to – indicates one person’s willingness to do something, to volunteer, to give consent.

Example:
I agreed to serve as a judge for the SPE Student Paper Contest.

3) To agree about – to have the same opinion of something.
Example:
We agree about religion, but disagree about politics.

4) To agree on or upon – to come to an understanding about what should be done, to accept stipulations or terms, usually after negotiation.
Examples:
We have agreed on the features and functionalities, but not the price.
They finally agreed upon a settlement during mediation.

The British often leave off the “on” or “upon,” which according to Webster is correct usage.
Example:
The jurors were unable to agree a verdict.
This makes me cringe, being the Yankee that I am. When editing, I usually put a preposition back in.

It’s usually OK to have a dangling preposition at the end of a sentence with these expressions,
particularly in spoken English.
Examples:
Those are the contract terms and deliverables you agreed to.
That’s one bill that Democrats and Republicans will never agree upon.
He’s a person I simply cannot agree with.
“He’s a person with whom I simply cannot agree” sounds really stuffy; however, if that
is the impression you want to leave, then by all means, use it.

When two or more people “are agreed,” they are in agreement.
Examples:
Are we agreed?  (= Do we agree?)
They were all agreed that the specification needs to be updated.

Something is “agreed to be” a certain way if many believe that it is true.
Example:
Julian is widely agreed to be one of the best software programmers in the company.

Like the hyphenated adjectives we have discussed lately, agreed-upon can be used to modify a
noun.
Example:
Grammar is an agreed-upon set of rules for constructing sentences.

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