On the Up-and-Up

In one of my Tips of the Day last year  titled “Up, Up  and Away” (https://oilpatchwriting.wordpress.com/2010/04/07/up-up-and-away/),
I covered some words that began with “up” that were hyphenated and some that were not. I’d like to discuss a few more “up” words.

The first one is “upward,” an adverb meaning in a direction opposite of down. This is preferred to “upwards,” according to the AP Stylebook.
One exception is the expression “upwards of,” meaning “more than.”

Example:
The department plans to spend upwards of $50 million on new automation equipment.

Of course, feel free to use “more than” rather than “upwards of” or “in excess of” to express this concept. Remember the KISS principle: Keep it simple, sweetie!

Here’s another one.

Upstate is not hyphenated, and it’s not capitalized unless it’s the first word in the sentence.
Example:
I grew up in a small town in upstate New York.

Many times models have to be  upscaled so that simulations won’t take so long to finish.
But don’t use the word “upscale” as a verb; use “scale up” instead, according to the SPE Style Guide.

Scaleup (not hyphenated) is used as a noun or adjective.

Bad Example:
We will need to upscale the geological model to run it faster on Petris.

Corrected Example:
We will need to scale up the geological model to run it faster on Petris. I will need some help with the scaleup.

And finally, what exactly does the idiomatic expression “on the up-and-up” mean?
It means that the situation or person in question is legitimate, honest, and respectable.
And yes, it is hyphenated, according to Webster’s dictionary.

Example:
In a crackdown on graft and corruption in West Africa, the company is refusing to do business with any local politician that is not on the up-and-up.

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