Try And vs. Try To

Here’s another Timely Tip brought to you by Shea Writing Solutions, a fast-growing Houston company that helps people “create clarity out of chaos, one sentence at a time.”

Which is correct?
A)      I will try and finish the report by the end of the week.
or
B)      I will try to finish the report by the end of the week.

The correct answer is B:
I will try to finish the report by the end of the week.

If you say, “I will try and finish the report by the end of the week,” you are saying that you are going to do two things:
(1)     try
and
(2)     finish the report by the end of the week.
Think of the word “and” as a combiner (conjunction) of the two verbs “try” and “finish.”

Here’s how Shea’s Ivy Jody-Castillo suggests you reason this out:
Use the word “attempt” in place of the word “try.”
You would not say: “I will attempt and finish the report by the end of the week.”
Rather, you would say: “I will attempt to finish the report by the end of the week.”

Webster’s Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary says that when “try” is used to mean “to make an attempt at,” it is often used with an infinitive, which means “to + verb.”
According to The Handbook of Technical Writing by Gerald J. Alred, et al., “The phrase ‘try and’ is colloquial for ‘try to’. For technical writing, use ‘try to.'”

So try to use “try to” instead of “try and,” OK?

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