Providence vs. Provenance

Here’s a sentence that has a subtle boo-boo:

Bad Example:
All available well logs were inspected; however, no providence for the “normalized” curves was provided.

I can understand why the author wanted to use the word “providence,” because the background history was not “provided.” But the correct word to use there is “provenance.”

Providence means divine guidance; provisions and direction from God. I don’t think those well logs were normalized by God himself!

Provenance, on the other hand, is a noun that means the origin or source, from the French word provenir, to come forth. The word “source” could be substituted correctly in the original example.

Corrected Example:
All available well logs were inspected; however, no source for the “normalized” curves was provided.
All available well logs were inspected; however, no provenance for the “normalized” curves was provided.

Howshall we remember this?
God (Providence) provides everything we need, whereas the source (Provenance) has to be proven.

————————————–
Profound Quote of the Day:
“Providence has nothing good or high in store for one who does not resolutely aim at something high or good. A purpose is the eternal condition of success.”
– Thornton Wilder, American novelist, 1897-1975
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