Totally vs. In Total

Totally is an adverb means “in a complete or total manner” or “to a complete or total degree.” It tells how something is done.
“Completely” and “fully” are synonyms of “totally,” so see if you can swap them and have the sentence make sense.

Example:
She’s not totally awake yet, as the baby’s crying kept her up all night.

Bad Example:
We plan to drill 436 wells totally between 2013 and 2025.
Swapped Example:
We plan to drill 436 wells completely between 2013 and 2025.

Of course you are going to drill them in a complete manner; that’s why we “complete” our wells.
Here you are talking about a full number of wells (noun), not the manner in which they are drilled (adverb). So use the noun “total.”

“In total” means “the whole number or amount” of something.

Example:
We plan to drill 436 wells in total between 2013 and 2025.

Another way to say the above example using the noun “total” is:
We plan to drill a total of 436 wells between 2013 and 2025.

Totally is also a slang word used by Valley Girls to mean “yes, indeed.”

Example:
He’s like, so cool, and like, so awesome! Totally!

————————————–
Profound Quote of the Day:
“If one is lucky, a solitary fantasy can totally transform one million realities.”
Maya Angelou, American poet, b. 1928
————————————–

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: