Prior To vs. Before

Grammar purists will tell you that you should not use the expression “prior to” as a preposition when you mean “before.”

They will tell you “prior” is an adjective that means “earlier” or “previous.” You wouldn’t say “earlier to” or “previous to,” so you shouldn’t use “prior to.”

My well-worn Webster’s dictionary says “prior to” is “pompous or affected,” and others say the expression is “stuffy,” and “longer, clumsier, and awash with pretension.”

My dictionary also says (under synonyms for preceding): “PREVIOUS and PRIOR imply existing or occurring earlier, but PRIOR often adds an implication of greater importance,” as in the word “priority.”

Examples:
Work orders with waivers approved prior to their due date are also considered compliant.
Work orders with waivers approved before their due date are also considered compliant.

The second one is simpler and clearer – especially if English is not your native language!

Funny Typo of the Day
“It is the responsibility of the Project Manager to ensure that all rules and regulations are followed to ensure food standing with local and state authorities.”

Snarky Comment:
Those local and state authorities – especially the police – can be bribed with doughnuts!

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Profound Quote of the Day:

“How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world!”
Anne Frank, German Jewish girl and diary author killed in the Holocaust, 1929-1945
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